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How To Detect Fraud at Petrol Pumps

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  • #16
    Maheshy1
    You can easily buy one of those 1-litre or 2-litre graduated plastic mugs, that people often use in the kitchen and ask them to fill a litre of fuel in that before pouring it into your car. That way you can check the accuracy, but at the end of the day, it is your word against theirs. Or in this case, your can against theirs!
    You could also check the accuracy of their measuring can (if they have a 1 litre or 2 litre one) by filling it in yours and then pouring that into their can to see if it is the same.
    Drink coffee and drive!

    Comment


    • #17
      Roshun, I never thought there were so many ways they could scam customers. I never really thought about the remaining fuel in the hose. Some pumps have really really long hoses that coil across the floor of the pump. But these days I've seen some pupms in Trivandrum and Chennai where the nozzle and the hose hang from the roof. The attendant just pulls it down and sets the quantity of fuel needed and off it goes. I guess this kind of dispensers are better for making sure that all of the fuel you've bought enters the tank. The jerky start-stop trick is the most common kind of scam I've seen in most petrol pumps across the country. I guess the only way to avoid is that by being attentive and making sure you are not tricked. I also agree that it's better to pay for fuel using a debit card or credit card instead of cash. Not only is it less of a hassle, you also get reward points in the case of credit cards which you can later claim for fuel or air tickets depending on the card you'got.

      Comment


      • #18
        NikilSJ Swiping debit cards sounds rewarding, but one must beware of card skimmers being used by crooks. These crooks use your card on a device called a 'skimmer' which essentially clones cards. When the guy swipes your card into the skimmer, the data in the magnetic strip is stolen. These guys also figure out the pin number when you type them. and with the help of a decoder, the data is then transferred into a card with an empty magnetic strip. Then, they use it to withdraw money from other ATMs or buy other card swiping machines under false names and the card is used on them and the cash goes into fake accounts.
        Apparently, a gang, working in different petrol pumps with this kind of modus operandi was caught a few years ago. That is why I don't prefer swiping my card at such places. I usually keep the money ready before I go to the pump so that it is handy to just hand him the money without any distractions.
        Keep the rubber side down!

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        • #19
          Praveen looks like you know a lot about card skimming. I'm a bit concerned now
          But on a serious note, I wish we had a self-serve system at out petrol stations like you see abroad. But then again there will be some idiot who'd want to immolate himself to support some stupid cause or the other, so I don't think that makes any sense too. I guess the only way to not get scammed is to be attentive and go to a trusted petrol pump near you.

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          • #20
            Reshma
            Different cars have different levels of fuel in reserve. Not all cars even have a warning light to show that fuel is low, and usually you just have to trust the fuel gauge. In the Alto K10, the last bar in the fuel gauge starts blinking when it hits reserve. It has about 11 bars in the digital fuel gauge when it has a full tank, which means that each bar is worth about 3 litres of fuel. So that way, when your last bar starts blinking, you probably have about 3 to 4 litres of fuel left in the tank. Some cars - even if the stated fuel tank capacity is 35 litres, they can hold 36 or 37 litres if you fill it to the brim. That's because the fuel in the pipe is usually not calibrated as part of fuel tank capacity.

            Drink coffee and drive!

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            • #21
              Same as the case in my old Ritz, I have 8 bars on my digital meter and the last bar acts as the reserve indicator, just as Roshun mentioned. So, you fill it the moment the last bar starts blinking. And the Ritz tank measures 43 litres, but once I had filled 45 litres into it. So yeah, it can hold more than the specifed quantity.
              if everything comes your way, you are in the wrong lane.

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              • #22
                I have been getting some queries on Whatsapp about the fuel tank capacity of cars and somehow petrol pumps manage to fill extra fuel, which is more than the fuel tank capacity of the car. How does this happen? Well, in some cases it could be short-fuelling by the pump, but in some cases, it's a problem with the stated capacity of the fuel tank.
                Suppose your car has a 60 litre fuel tank, it should hold only 60 litres max right? I mean if you take it into the pump when it is almost bone dry, it should not fill in more than 60, considering there may be a litre or two in the tank anyway. However, many are shocked to see that the car will hold about 62-63 litres of fuel.
                The reason that happens is because the stated fuel tank capacity does not take into account the extra capacity in the fuel filler pipe (around 2-4 litres) and fuel lines (another litre or more depending on the car). This discrepancy more often than not happens when you fill fuel right up to the brim of the fuel tank filler cap. So if you do go to fill fuel and find that your car takes in more than its stated capacity when almost dry, don't panic if the amount is just a couple of litres more.
                But do raise a red flag if you know that you probably already have a certain amount of fuel in the tank and it still fills to capacity.

                Also see: http://www.zigwheels.com/forum/posts...-from-your-car
                Drink coffee and drive!

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                • #23
                  Roshun petroleum ministry sweet dreams

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Zig Wheels deserves a big Thank You for bringing said glaring frauds to the notice of Car and Bike owners which they are being put to. While the Govt. Inspectors / officers of the respective Petrol and Oil Companies do need to check their petrol pumps and make sure that said sort of frauds are not committed and the customers are not fooled / cheated, it becomes the responsibility of the C&B owners also to be cautious at the time of getting fuel for their vehicles and insist on issuing printed bills etc.

                    I wish, if the concerned authorities in the Govt (Petroleum Ministry) get notice of listed alleged frauds and take needful action.

                    - Parshuram Gautampurkar, Sawai Madhopur, Rajasthan

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                    • #25
                      Parshuram_Gautampurkar, the problem is not only whether the government takes action or not, its a lot to do with the greed of the management at the petrol pumps. The owners of the pumps are also kept in the dark as far as these frauds are concerned, the profits from all these are often divided among the emplyees there. I know a few pump owners and they themselves have caught some of the workers cheating and chucked them out instantly. As you rightly said, the only way to be sure about not being cheated on a pump is completely in the hands of the C&B owners. Extra caution goes a long way!
                      No traction, more action!

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                      • #26
                        The List of services a fuel pump operator has to offer under the Special Petrol Pump Guidelines formulated by the Oil Marketing Companies which also include penalties to be levied on petrol pumps that do not adhere to these stringent regulations.

                        So, What are these?

                        * Correct quantity of fuel at correct prices
                        * Provision of Air Facility to customers during operating hours
                        * Prompt and courteous behavior of stall at all times
                        * Provision of a complaint/suggestion book which should be offered to customers on demand
                        * Prominent display of working hours and holidays to be displayed well ahead of time
                        * Clean toilets on premises
                        * Provision of telephone facility on premises
                        * Name and contact number of dealer and name and contact number of Oil Company to be prominently displayed
                        * Customer Service Cell messages and posters on Customer Education to be displayed
                        * Provision of First Aid Box with necessary medicines and first aid kit
                        * Provision of good illumination throughout the outlet and adherence to housekeeping standards as indicated by Oil Companies
                        * Provision of safety equipment which should be on hand and in perfect working condition while dealers / staff should be trained in its operation

                        Next time, do demand these services
                        if everything comes your way, you are in the wrong lane.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          On my recent North-South-North drive with CorsaVeloce, NikilSJ and MotuSid down to Bangalore and then on to Coorg, Goa, Pune and back (See DETAILS), I noticed another very peculiar thing. Filling up diesel from Bharat Petroleum and Indian Oil didn't really give me any great mileage - I mean it gave me the mileage I had expected, and I have been getting so far on my Scorpio S10 4WD. The average hovered around 12.4 kmpl tankful to tankful with high-speed highway driving (the Scorpio has the aerodynamics of a brick, so beyond 100 kmph, you are only fighting a losing battle with the wind). When average speeds were lower, I did get something in the region of 13.4 kmpl displayed.

                          ‚ÄčThen at Pune, kaiserketkar suggested I tank up on Shell diesel (which is just about a buck more) and see the difference. I was anyway heading to Mumbai on the expressway to meet HVKumar before continuing on to Ratlam.

                          Tanking up Shell, with a lady attendant doing the filling:
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                          I was a bit sceptical if there would be any drastic improvement in mileage although many had told me that it really works. Anyway, after tanking up, I set off towards Mumbai (Thane actually) on the famed Mumbai-Pune expressway. I set cruise control at 100 kmph and let the Scorpio roll along comfortably, rarely accelerating beyond that. Earlier, at that speed, my MID would settle at about 13.4-13.6 kmpl. But I was shocked to see it show 16.8 kmpl for quite a while, reaching Thane with not even a bar disappearing from the fuel gauge even after nearly 138 km of high speed driving with the AC and the rains.
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                          I decided to see how much I could stretch it, and to my surprise it went close to 630 km before I decided to refuel - and only because I saw a Reliance fuel pump. I still had nearly quarter tank of fuel left in the Scorpio. It sipped 47 litres, giving a tankful to tankful mileage of 13.5 kmpl, up to the brim.

                          Refilling at a Reliance pump at Khalghat, near Indore, Madhya Pradesh:
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                          This tank of diesel from Reliance, near Indore lasted all the way till the expressway just before Jaipur (the Kishangarh expressway). This too was pretty superior fuel compared to BP / Indian Oil. The mileage was a little lower at 12.6 kmpl, brimful to brimful, but that was to be expected given the number of times, I had to slow down & accelerate to get around trucks from Ratlam right up to Jaipur, including a few ghat sections. A similar stretch in MP on the journey to Bangalore had the Scorpio give only 11.8 kmpl. Sure, the gains are not that significant overall, but it is still something to reckon with. That aside, the pick up felt better, and the engine felt much smoother. Is that purely psychological? I don't know, but I do think we are being short changed with inferior fuel from IOL / BP. The refining standards are clearly different. It's not just me - but many others have also felt the results of better mileage with Shell or Reliance fuels.
                          What do you think? Do our IOC / BP / HP pumps need to improve their quality of fuel?
                          Drink coffee and drive!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Roshun View Post
                            Tanking up Shell, with a lady attendant doing the filling:
                            [ATTACH=CONFIG]n13223[/ATTACH]
                            I was a bit sceptical if there would be any drastic improvement in mileage although many had told me that it really works. Anyway, after tanking up, I set off towards Mumbai (Thane actually) on the famed Mumbai-Pune expressway. I set cruise control at 100 kmph and let the Scorpio roll along comfortably, rarely accelerating beyond that. Earlier, at that speed, my MID would settle at about 13.4-13.6 kmpl. But I was shocked to see it show 16.8 kmpl for quite a while, reaching Thane with not even a bar disappearing from the fuel gauge even after nearly 138 km of high speed driving with the AC and the rains.
                            [ATTACH=CONFIG]n13224[/ATTACH]
                            I decided to see how much I could stretch it, and to my surprise it went close to 630 km before I decided to refuel - and only because I saw a Reliance fuel pump. I still had nearly quarter tank of fuel left in the Scorpio. It sipped 47 litres, giving a tankful to tankful mileage of 13.5 kmpl, up to the brim.
                            This same Shell pump has given my Scorpio fabulous FE too - its lifetime highest of 14.5 kmpl

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Roshun, I had the same experience in the Honda BRV. Although I did not get fuel from Shell, there was a noticeable difference with Reliance fuel. I was averaging about 18-19 kmpl on fuel from IOC/Bharat Petroleum and with Reliance, it went up to 21 kmpl.
                              No traction, more action!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Roshun I've had great mileage from this pump as well. If you remember, when I tested the mileage of my XUV on the Expressway, I got a phenomenal mileage of 21.41kmpl. A lot of it had to do with the way I drove, but I'm sure some of the credit should go to Shell diesel. As to the "why" part of it, yes, refining process might be a factor, but I feel the adulteration that is rumored to happen in transit as well as at the bunk level might be the cause. I've read Reliance & Shell run quite a tight ship, whereas Govt companies are only now waking up the this reality.

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