How Can Drivers Be Made To Obey Laws?

How Can Drivers Be Made To Obey Laws?

How Can Drivers Be M..

  • 08 Nov 2016, 3955 Views
 

JijoMalayil

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Member: 02 Nov, 2015

Total Posts: 2293

  • 8 Nov 2016, 3:48 pm ( 1 Photo )
Lawmakers around the world are trying hard to enforce a variety of laws, especially ones pertaining to road safety, where enforcing the said laws will result in averting fatal accidents and saving countless lives. In a country like India, these laws look harsh on paper but hardly gets enforced at the right time.
A change in the mindset of the present and the upcoming generation is the only solution. To be socially aware of things that can cause harm to others and yourself has to come from within, in my opinion. Take for instance the nuisance of using the high beam in the city is punishable under the law in India. But how many instances of this law getting implemented have you seen in the recent past? Is there a simple and possible solution to change the mindset of people? China has found a very sensible and effective solution. If a driver is caught using the high beam in a city, he is either required to pay a hefty fine of 300 yuan (Rs 2,935) or you choose to skip the fine by opting to sit in front of their respective cars and stare at the headlight for 60 seconds. This is done so as the person experiences exactly what they are putting other drivers through by using the high beam. The Shenzen police, after this policy was implemented, has stopped more than 900 offenders in less than two hours. The Shenzen police posted a picture of an offender being put through the punishment of staring at their own headlamps with the post “Tonight we are carrying out punishments using a high beam.” The picture below has amassed over 87,000 likes and 93,000 shares. Will this kind of action work in India? Will people reflect upon their actions after a punishment like this and consciously not repeat the same offence again?
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Road safety in a country like India, where we witness the most number of people dying of road-related accidents in the world is extremely important. Instances like driving on the wrong side of the road, jumping the traffic light, changing lanes without putting the indicator on, over-speeding and drunken driving to name a few have to be dealt with an iron fist. Apart from stricter laws and thorough enforcement, what can be other sensible solutions to the above-mentioned issues? Do feel free to add your thoughts and suggestions by commenting below.

Arjun

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Member: 26 Oct, 2015

Total Posts: 734

  • 8 Nov 2016, 7:59 pm

JijoMalayil
Every time the fine is increased, people complain that it's too much. In order to curb this, in Finland, the traffic fines are based on the income of a person. This would be little difficult to implement in India, as there are many who have hidden income sources. But still, something on the lines would he effective.
A Rs 1000 fine for a person who earns crores is nothing and they would not think twice before breaking the rule again. However if it's a percentage of their income (like a day's salary) it would pinch.
Similarly, in some countries, they have one day jail (not rigorous imprisonment), where they show them road safety videos and give a refresher course of traffic rules. This is also given as an option to take the classes instead of paying the fines. This way, awareness also can be spread.
One major factor is awareness. As our driving tests are not strict, most of the drivers do not know the traffic rules properly. In my case, it's only when I drove in the UK, I came to realise about many traffic rules which are valid even in India.
Also, over the fine, a point system, which leads to cancellation of the license should also be implemented. Right now, as the driving license system is not centralised, even if a driving license from one state is cancelled, the person can easily get a driving license from another state. This practice can be stopped by having a centralised list of cars and driving license details.

suyog

First Gear

Member: 26 Sep, 2016

Total Posts: 59

  • 10 Nov 2016, 9:02 pm

Arjun
As you said, points system with centralised data across the country should be implemented ASAP. Losing the license and the ability to drive will be a big deterrent.
Also, the quantum of fine based on income is a good idea but hard to implement. So I guess fine should be levied based on the cost of the vehicle. Like, if you own a luxurious car, the fine could be 10 times than may be for a simple bike. This fine could be adjusted automatically with RTO tax. Like NCB for insurance, it will give incentive to people to drive safely.

NikilSJ

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Member: 02 Nov, 2015

Total Posts: 2343

  • 18 Nov 2016, 3:20 pm ( 3 Photos )
The Chinese seem to be an innovative lot, especially when it comes to idiots driving with their high beams on all the time. Here’s a solution I came across recently where drivers in some part of China have been using these freaky as hell rear window decals that are only visible when the tailgater uses his high beams.

The decals feature images of ghosts and monsters from Eastern and Hollywood flicks. But according another report based out of Jinan, the police are taking serious action against folks who use these stickers as they say it has the potential to cause major accidents. The decal makers say these stickers are not visible in the dead of the night and only appear when a beam of light hits it. Whatever you may think of it, I feel this is an innovative way to curb people using high beams. Now if only someone can come up with a solution to curb the oncoming traffic, especially white Fortuners with HR number plates. It will make the world a less stressful place.


Praveen

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Member: 01 Dec, 2015

Total Posts: 2027

  • 18 Nov 2016, 3:43 pm
NikilSJ
This is actually brilliant! If I had a car, I'd totally use this, particularly with the #13! There are way too many people using high-beams here. Drivers don't dip their beams even if we signal them to. The moment road illumination goes down a little, these drivers switch to high-beams and don't switch back, ever! It gets even worse on narrow roads because there's no space to focus one's eyes elsewhere.

Arjun

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Member: 26 Oct, 2015

Total Posts: 734

  • 18 Nov 2016, 3:54 pm
Praveen
In India, you would get a different reaction. He may see it first and then would keep the beam high to see what it is. Many others may switch from low to high beam to check if there is any such stickers.
Driving with high beams is a major issue in India. Even in places with good street light, many people continue to use high beams. Worse is the high beams from projector headlamps. They are too powerful and distracting.

Praveen

Enthusiast

Member: 01 Dec, 2015

Total Posts: 2027

  • 18 Nov 2016, 4:07 pm
Arjun
Hahahaaa!! Damn true!! That's exactly how Indian mentality is! Yeah, projectors are bad and HID's are even worse. Another annoyance I've faced here is the white strobe lights on Splendors, especially in Old Delhi side. The urge to run over these idiots is too damn high!

KPR

First Gear

Member: 22 Feb, 2016

Total Posts: 70

  • 18 Nov 2016, 5:27 pm
Honking unnecessarily, don't know any bit about high or low beam, over loading a car these are traits of Indians which cannot be easily solved unless there is an automated system inbuilt in car to counter the above.

Arjun

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Member: 26 Oct, 2015

Total Posts: 734

  • 18 Nov 2016, 5:28 pm ( 2 Photos )
Praveen
o oh. I just got LED strobe lights for my bicycle. I wanted something bright and wanted to be visible.
Hope someone doesn't decide to run over me.
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Roshun

Super Moderator

Member: 13 Oct, 2015

Total Posts: 2035

  • 20 Nov 2016, 11:32 am
Arjun
I've thought of getting a fat bit of chrome or a mirror-finish on the lower portion of the rear windscreen to deter high-beamers. Reflect their own light back to them. I know that the fat chrome strip on the Brezza and Honda Amaze really do reflect a lot of light. The new Hexa should also be quite effective at doing that.

NikilSJ

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Member: 02 Nov, 2015

Total Posts: 2343

  • 21 Nov 2016, 12:39 pm ( 2 Photos )
"Originally posted by Praveen"
NikilSJThis is actually brilliant! If I had a car, I'd totally use this, particularly with the #13! There are way too many people using high-beams here. Drivers don't dip their beams even if we signal them to. The moment road illumination goes down a little, these drivers switch to high-beams and don't switch back, ever! It gets even worse on narrow roads because there's no space to focus one's eyes elsewhere.

Hahaha. No.13 is realistic but i'd rather use my own face
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The reason why I think people use high beam all the time is that while they learn driving, I think the instructors tell them that your headlamps are switched on only when the blue high beam indicator is visible on the instrument console. It's high time driving instructors take teaching how to drive seriously.

NikilSJ

Moderator

Member: 02 Nov, 2015

Total Posts: 2343

  • 21 Nov 2016, 12:41 pm
"Originally posted by Arjun"
PraveenIn India, you would get a different reaction. He may see it first and then would keep the beam high to see what it is. Many others may switch from low to high beam to check if there is any such stickers. Driving with high beams is a major issue in India. Even in places with good street light, many people continue to use high beams. Worse is the high beams from projector headlamps. They are too powerful and distracting.

Hahahaha. That's funny but true. And yes projector lamps are the worst. HIDs are on another level altogether. The traffic cops should pull up people using high beams and HIDs and slap a huge fine. What other way is possible to deter these idiots from driving with high beams!

JijoMalayil

Moderator

Member: 02 Nov, 2015

Total Posts: 2293

  • 11 Jan 2017, 5:19 pm
We are in the midst of the Road Safety Week 2017 right now that was kicked off on the 9th of January. The theme for the same this year is 'Your safety secures your family. Be cautious on roads’. In India, nearly 1.5 lakh people lose their lives every year due to road accidents. What is more unfortunate that there is a 4.6 percent increase in road accidents in 2016 when compared to the previous year. Can we as individuals pledge to follow the rules on the road, maybe try to inculcate the same with the incoming generation? Do comment on the possible solutions to reduce fatalities, save precious lives on our roads.

Fourth Div