Nissan Evalia vs Toyota Innova : Comparison

After a premium hatchback and entry level sedan, Nissan has entered the MPV segment in India with the Evalia. But does the Evalia have the right stuff to take on the ubiquitous segment leader, the...

 

Nissan Evalia vs Toyota Innova exterior front

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Nissan has certainly kicked its India game up a notch this year. In 2010, the company brought in its first ‘made-in-India’ offering, the Micra hatchback and last year, followed it up with an entry level sedan based on the hatch in the form of the Sunny. This year though, the Japanese auto maker is treating us to a different sort of machine, one that’ll play in a segment that might deal with slightly fewer numbers, but one where the competition is as cut-throat as that in the hatchback market. Yes, we’re talking about the MPV, or multi-purpose vehicle segment, and the car is Nissan’s latest offering, the Evalia. Now as we said, the competition in this segment is quite cut-throat, and we’re not even venturing into the budget MPV segment. Sticking to just the ‘premium’ MPV, the incumbent ruler here is the Toyota Innova and there is no better vehicle to compare the Evalia to. 

 

While these two cars might be designed to serve a similar purpose, they’re as different as chalk and cheese. The Innova sticks with a traditional body-on-ladderframe chassis design, while the Evalia has a monocoque chassis much like a modern sedan or hatchback. The Innova uses an engine that you would expect to see doing duty in an MPV, a 2.5-litre diesel motor, while the Evalia uses the same 1.5-litre DCi diesel engine that does duty in all of Nissan’s, as well as Renault’s, cars in India. There are a fair amount of differences in the equipment levels too and definitely in the pricing as well. But at the end of the day, both these cars are modern, urban MPVs that definitely have appeal that goes beyond your everyday fleet operator.

 

 

Nissan Evalia vs Toyota Innova exterior rear

 

 

So how do the two of these stack up? Well, there’s no point comparing these cars, or should we say vans, on the standard performance parameters, because let’s face it, they would never really bring out what these two do best. The optimal, and daresay the only, factors to really consider are the space and practicality aspects. Only if a car is actually found lacking in any of the other parameters will there be a strong enough case against it. But we’re dealing with Japanese biggies like Nissan and Toyota here – companies which have refined their ways of making cars right down to a science. So the chance that there will be anything to really complain about in these departments is rather minuscule.

 

 

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by Priyadarshan Bawikar Photography: Kunal Khadse Posted on 01 Nov 2012

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